Skip to content →

Fat Flora

intestines-microflora

November’s paper was published in Nature in 2006, and covers a topic I’ve become increasingly interested in: the impact of the bacteria that have colonized our bodies  on our health (something I’ve blogged about here and here).

The idea that our bodies are, in some ways, more bacteria than human (there are 10x more gut bacteria – or flora — than human cells on our bodies) and that those bacteria can play a key role on our health is not only mind-blowing, it opens up another potential area for medical/life sciences research and future medicines/treatments.

In the paper, a genetics team from Washington University in St. Louis explored a very basic question: are the gut bacteria from obese individuals different from those from non-obese individuals? To study the question, they performed two types of analyses on a set of mice with a genetic defect leading to an inability of the mice to “feel full” (and hence likely to become obese) and genetically similar mice lacking that defect (the s0-called “wild type” control).

The first was a series of genetic experiments comparing the bacteria found within the gut of obese mice with those from the gut of “wild-type” mice (this sort of comparison is something the field calls metagenomics). In doing so, the researchers noticed a number of key differences in the “genetic fingerprint” of the two sets of gut bacteria, especially in the genes involved in metabolism.

imageBut, what did that mean to the overall health of the animal? To answer that question, the researchers did a number of experiments, two of which I will talk about below. First, they did a very simple chemical analysis (see figure 3b to the left) comparing the “leftover energy” in the waste (aka poop) of the obese mice to the waste of wild-type mice (and, yes, all of this was controlled for the amount of waste/poop). Lo and behold, the obese mice (the white bar) seemed to have gut bacteria which were significantly better at pulling calories out of the food, leaving less “leftover energy”.

imageWhile an interesting result, especially when thinking about some of the causes and effects of obesity, a skeptic might look at that data and say that its inconclusive about the role of gut bacteria in obesity – after all, obese mice could have all sorts of other changes which make them more efficient at pulling energy out of food. To address that, the researchers did a very elegant experiment involving fecal transplant: that’s right, colonize one mouse with the bacteria from another mouse (by transferring poop). The figure to the right (figure 3c) shows the results of the experiment. After two weeks, despite starting out at about the same weight and eating similar amounts of the same food, wild type mice that received bacteria from other wild type mice showed an increase in body fat of about 27%, whereas the wild type mice that received bacteria from the obese mice showed an increase of about 47%! Clearly, gut bacteria in obese mice are playing a key role in calorie uptake!

In terms of areas of improvement, my main complaint about this study is just that it doesn’t go far enough. The paper never gets too deep on what exactly were the bacteria in each sample and we didn’t really get a sense of the real variation: how much do bacteria vary from mouse to mouse? Is it the completely different bacteria? Is it the same bacteria but different numbers? Is it the same bacteria but they’re each functioning differently? Do two obese mice have the same bacteria? What about a mouse that isn’t quite obese but not quite wild-type either? Furthermore, the paper doesn’t show us what happens if an obese mouse has its bacteria replaced with the bacteria from a wild-type mouse. These are all interesting questions that would really help researchers and doctors understand what is happening.

But, despite all of that, this was a very interesting finding and has major implications for doctors and researchers in thinking about how our complicated flora impact and are impacted by our health.

(Image credit) (Figure 3 from the paper)

Paper: Turnbaugh et al., “An obesity-associated gut microbiome with increased capacity for energy harvest.” Nature (444). 21/28 Dec 2006. doi:10.1038/nature05414

Published in Blog

One Comment

  1. […] Like with the paper I blogged for last month, this month’s paper (from open access journal PLoS ONE) is yet again about the impact on our health of the bacteria which have decided to call our bodies home. But, instead of the bacteria living in our gut, this month is about the bacteria which live on our skin. […]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

%d bloggers like this: