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I know enough to get myself in trouble

One of the dangers of a consultant looking at tech is that he can get lost in jargon. A few weeks ago, I did a little research on some of the most cutting-edge software startups in the cloud computing space (the idea that you can use a computer feature/service without actually knowing anything about what sort of technology infrastructure was used to provide you with that feature/service – i.e., Gmail and Yahoo Mail on the consumer side, services like Amazon Web Services and Microsoft Azure on the business side). As a result, I’ve looked at the product offerings from guys like Nimbula, Cloudera, Clustrix, Appistry, Elastra, and MaxiScale, to name a few. And, while I know enough about cloud computing to understand, at a high level, what these companies do, the use of unclear terminology sometimes makes it very difficult to pierce the “fog of marketing” and really get a good understanding of the various product strengths and weaknesses.

Is it any wonder that, at times, I feel like this Dilbert cartoon?:

image

Yes, its all about that “integration layer” …

My take? A great product should not need to hide behind jargon. Alas, if only more people listened…

(Link: Dilbert cartoon)

Published in Blog

  • I had to cover the Web 2.0 Expo for work and had the damnedest time trying to figure out what each company did. After penetrating the marketing-speak, it ended up being almost universally “<insert consumer web 2.0 app> — for Enterprise!”

  • Ben

    Very true, I think when I actually dug beneath the surface, most of it wound
    up being the same; it makes me wonder if there is a huge bubble of
    un-differentiated guys here (although the startups I mentioned in the post
    directly, I believe, have a leg up)

  • It doesn't help that their company and product names are all fucking stupid.

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