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Tag: Android Honeycomb

Motorola Solutions Takes on the Tablet

I mentioned a couple of months ago my recent “conversion” to the tablet: how I am now convinced that tablets are more than just a cool consumer device, but represent a new vector of compute power which will find itself going into more and more places.

One particular use case which fascinated me was in the non-consumer setting, what is mostly “fresh territory” for tablet manufacturers to pursue. But, whereas most manufacturers — like Lenovo and Toshiba — are taking on the non-consumer setting by chasing the traditional enterprise technology market, Motorola Solutions, which was spun out from the original Motorola alongside (but separate from) the consumer-oriented Motorola Mobility which was recently acquired by Google — they build things like hardware/IT systems for businesses and governments, has taken a much more customized approach (HT: EETimes) which really embodies some of the strengths of the Android approach.

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Instead of building yet another Android Honeycomb tablet, Motorola Solutions has built a ruggedized Android tablet called the ET1 (Enterprise Tablet 1 – hey, they sell mainly to industrial and government customers where you don’t need catchy names :-)), with the emphasis on the word “ruggedized”. Yes, it has a 7” touchscreen, but this really wasn’t meant for casual consumer use at home: its meant to be used in the field/factory setting, built with a strengthened case and Gorilla Glass screen (so that it can survive drops/spills/impacts), support for external accessories (i.e. barcode scanners, printers, holsters/cases), a special hot-swappable rapid charge battery pack so that you can re-juice the device without interrupting the device function, and a “hardened” (translation: more secure by stripping out unnecessary consumer-oriented capabilities) Android operating system with support for rapidly switching between multiple user profiles (because multiple employees might use the same device on different shifts).

Will this device be a huge success? Probably not by any consumer electronic manufacturer’s metric. After all, the tablet isn’t meant for consumers (and won’t be priced that way or sold through stores/consumer eCommerce sites). But, that’s the beauty of the Android approach. If you’re not building a consumer tablet, you don’t have to. In the same way that Android phone manufacturers/software developers can experiment with different price points/business models in Africa, manufacturers can leverage (and customize) Android to target different use models and form factors entirely to satisfy the needs of specific market segments/ecosystem players, taking what they need and changing/removing what they don’t. I don’t know for sure what Motorola Solutions is aiming to get out of this, but maybe the goal isn’t to put as many of these devices out there as possible but simply to add a few key accounts with which to sell other services/software. I have no idea, but the point is that an open platform lets you do things like this. Or, to put it more simply, as I said before about Linux/Android: “go custom or go home”.

(Image credit)

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The Prodigal Tablet Convert

lg-android-tabletWhen the Wifi-only version of the first Android Honeycomb tablet, the Motorola Xoom, became available for sale, I bought the device, partly because of my “Fandroid” love for Android devices but mostly because, as a Tech enthusiast, I felt like I needed to own a tablet just to understand what everyone was talking about.

While I liked the device (especially after the Honeycomb 3.1 update), I felt a little weird because I didn’t really have a good idea of why I would ever need it. Tablets, while functional and cool, were not as large in screen size or as powerful as a laptop (some of which are also pretty portable: take my girlfriend’s recently purchased Lenovo X220 or the new MacBook Airs for instance), they weren’t as cheap/didn’t have as long of a battery life/didn’t have the amazing displays of dedicated eReaders like Amazon’s Kindle, and they weren’t as portable as a smartphone. I was frankly baffled: just when would you use an iPad/an Android tablet instead of a laptop, eReader, or a smartphone?

It didn’t help that many of my friends seemed to give waffling answers (and no, it didn’t really vary whether or not they had an iPad or an Android tablet – sorry Apple fanboi’s, you’re not that special :-)) or that one of the partners at my fund had misplaced his iPad and didn’t realize it for a month! To hopefully discover the “killer application” for these mysterious devices, I pushed myself to use the tablet more to see if I could find a “natural fit” and, except for gaming and for reading/browsing casually in bed, the whole experience felt very “well, I needed a bigger screen than my phone and was too lazy to turn on my laptop.” So for quite some time, I simply chalked up the latest demand as people wanting the latest gadget rather than anything particularly useful.

ASUS_EeePad_Transformer_-550x412This changed recently when, on a whim, I decided to buy carrying case and Bluetooth keyboard for my Xoom. And, upon receiving it, I was kind of blown away. Although it looked (and still does) a little funny to me — why use a Tablet plus Bluetooth Keyboard when you could just use a laptop –  that was enough to change my perspective on the utility of the device. It was no longer just a “bigger smartphone” – it became the full potential of what the netbook category itself had aimed to be: an easy-to-use, cheap consumer-grade laptop replacement that was not sucked into the “Wintel” dominion of Intel and Microsoft. It was that realization/newfound purpose for the device (as well as a nifty $100 off coupon) which also sucked my girlfriend, a long skeptic of why I had bought a tablet, in to buying an ASUS Eee Pad Transformer and dock (see image to the left).

I know its not the most profound of epiphanies – after all, even in my first comment on the iPad speculations I had suggested the potential risk to Apple of letting the iPad be so good that it starts replacing lower-end Macbook Air/Macbook devices – but suddenly the ability to write longer emails/compose documents made my tablet the go-to device for everything but the most processor-intensive or intricate of tasks, and that, combined with the abundance of tablets I’ve seen in Silicon Valley business settings, has convinced me that the “killer app” for the iPad and the Xoom and the whole host of coming Android tablets will be as computer replacements.

So, (hardware and software) developers out there and folks who want to pursue something potentially very disruptive or who want the venture capital side of me to pay attention to you: find me killer new apps/services designed to help tablets more replace computers (especially in the enterprise – I have become somewhat enchanted by that opportunity) and you’ll get it.

(Image credit – Tablet) (Image credit – ASUS Eee Pad Transformer)

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