Skip to content →

A Cure for Diabetes

(Bear with me a bit, I promise I do get to the title eventually) One of the most formative classes I took in college was a class taught by Professor Doug Melton on stem cells. While truth be told, I’ve forgotten most of what I used to know about the growth factors and specifics of how stem cells work, the class left me with two powerful ideas.

The first is that true understanding requires you to overcome your own intellectual laziness. Its not enough to just take what a so-called expert says at face value — you should question her assumptions, her evidence, her interpretation, her controls (or lack thereof), and only after questioning these things can you properly make up your own mind. While I can’t say I’ve lived up to that challenge to the fullest extent, its been a helpful guide in my coursework and in my career as a consultant, then investor, and now entrepreneur.

The second was about the importance of personal passion as a motivating force. Professor Melton’s research and expertise into stem cells was driven in no small part by the desire to find a cure for diabetes, a condition which one of his kids suffers from. It was something which made him (and his lab) work harder at finding a way to take on the daunting task of taking stem cells and turning them into the beta islet cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. It made him advocate for the creation of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute and to strongly vocalize his opinions on legitimizing stem cell research (something which I had the pleasure of interviewing him on when I worked with Nextgen).

And, its paid off! Very recently, Melton’s lab published a paper in the journal Cell which claims to have devised a way to take stem cells and turn them into functioning beta islet cells capable of secreting insulin into the bloodstreams of diabetic mice that they’re transplanted in and reduce the high blood sugar levels that are a hallmark of the disease! While I have yet to read the paper (something I’ll try to get around to eventually) and this is still a ways off from a human therapy, its amazing to see the lab achieve this goal which seemed so challenging back when I was in college (not to mention, years earlier, when Melton first wanted to tackle the problem!)

Having met various members of the Melton lab (as well as the man himself), I can’t say how happy I am for the team and how great it is that we’ve made such a breakthrough in the fight against diabetes.

Published in Blog

%d bloggers like this: