Skip to content →

How Often Does a $3 Billion Valuation Come Along?

Snapchat-reportedly-said-no-to-3-billion-in-cash-from-Facebook

I blogged recently about why companies like Facebook are willing to pay large amounts for barely-in-revenue-if-at-all companies like Snapchat – but that’s a question about the buyer. The question dozens of entrepreneurs and venture investors are asking themselves is: should Snapchat have taken Facebook’s rumored bid?

While the right answer to that is a combination of personal (what does the team want to do) and business (what do we see as the likely path forward for the company), one question we can answer objectively is how often does such an exit happen?

As part of an exercise to try to better understand when and where big venture-backed opportunities lie, I pulled together data from Dow Jone’s Venturesource service and cross-matched it with companies from S&P’s Capital IQ to try to identify the home runs that venture capitalists pat themselves on the back for since 2002 (the end of the 2000’s dot-com bubble and burst).

My dataset showed 23 venture-backed outcomes that exceeded $3 billion in valuation (factoring in a 180-day lockup period that accompanies most IPOs where investors and key employees cannot sell stock, except for companies listed which haven’t had that 180-days of history then which I added the most recent market cap). Five of these (Yandex, Hibu, Biosensor Applications, Carmat SAS, and CTC Media) are not U.S. companies and an additional three (MetroPCS, Antero Resources, and First Republic Bank) are what I would call “unconventional” (i.e., an organization which does VC investments was involved in a pre-exit financing but they don’t fit the usual profile). So, more practically, since 2002, only 15 U.S.-based venture-backed companies have achieved exits in excess of $3 billion.

Company Valuation ($M) Exit Date Type Sector

Google

$53B

Aug 2004

IPO

Search

Facebook

$48B

May 2012

IPO

Social

Twitter

$22B

Nov 2013

IPO

Social

Workday

$9.8B

Oct 2012

IPO

Business Software

LinkedIn

$7.2B

May 2011

IPO

Social

Groupon

$6.9B

Nov 2011

IPO

Coupon

Veeva

$4.8B

Oct 2013

IPO

Business Software

FireEye

$4.5B

Sep 2013

IPO

Security

Tableau

$3.9B

May 2013

IPO

Business Software

Palo Alto Networks

$3.7B

Jul 2012

IPO

Security

Service Now

$3.7B

Jun 2012

IPO

Business Software

Zynga

$3.7B

Dec 2011

IPO

Gaming

Hyperion

$3.3B

Mar 2007

M&A

Business Software

Doubleclick

$3.1B

Mar 2008

M&A

Adtech

Splunk

$3.1B

Apr 2012

IPO

Business Software

Of those 15, only two are acquisitions — Hyperion Solutions (a business intelligence software company bought by Oracle) and DoubleClick (a leading ad exchange bought by Google) – the remainder are IPOs, and only 5 or 6 (depending on if you count LinkedIn) are direct-to-consumer in the same way that Snapchat is.

In short, Snapchat supposedly walked away from an outcome which is extremely rare and so the Snapchat founders/board, if they’re being “rational”, are clearly focused on building a standalone, IPO-able company of the size of a Google/Facebook/Twitter/Groupon/Zynga.

They have had remarkable traction to date and it will be interesting to see if they look back on this as a big mistake or the beginning of when the rest of the world understood just how big of a company they could become.

(Image source – PhoneArena.com)

Published in Blog

  • ao

    4 in 2013 (so far!), 5 in 2012, 3 in 2011, 3 from 2002 to 2010. interesting time distribution

  • Ben

    It is an interesting distribution. Obviously, this is part due to the stock market conditions recently and part due to VCs getting smarter about extracting higher market caps pre-IPO, but the concentration implies something about the timing — I’m scratching my head as to what that is…

  • Genevieve

    Nice piece. Aileen Lee (formerly of Kleiner Perkins) wrote a similar piece a few weeks ago: http://techcrunch.com/2013/11/02/welcome-to-the-unicorn-club/

  • Ryan Chan

    Super interesting. Also note that all of these had fairly strong revenues at exit, and most (8/15) are B2B focused.

%d bloggers like this: