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Tipping is Stupid

Maybe its because I miss Japan, a land with a culture which prides itself on extremely good service but where tipping is practically unheard of (also where I just spent two weeks on my honeymoon). But, lately, I’ve been thinking that tipping is stupid.

  • I’ve found that, except in rare instances of extremely good or extremely bad service, the amount of tip given has almost nothing to do with the quality of service – which makes it a terrible system for rewarding good service and punishing bad service.
  • It feels horribly arbitrary who and how much you tip. Why do we tip the bagboy but not the people who work at the front desk? Why do we tip cab drivers but not a airplane pilot or a flight attendant? And just how much are we supposed to tip? Why 15% at restaurants…? What about cabs? Bellboys? Strippers?
  • It encourages establishments to pay their employees less, and to be less smart about how they pay their employees. At the end of the day, I tip because I know the recipients tend to be in professions which count on tips for a substantial portion of their income. But this fact begs the question: why should this come in the form of a tip as opposed to a proper wage? After all, employers are in a far better position to have a holistic view on which employees to compensate and how much to insure good service – and why that should be left to the whims of different customer moods and mores is beyond me.

Much to my delight and surprise, while driving home from work, I had the chance to listen to a great story about an establishment called Sushi Yasuda in Manhattan on APM’s Marketplace (the podcast I turn to for news). The quote which caught my attention:

Following the custom in Japan, Sushi Yasuda’s service staff are fully compensated by their salary. Therefore gratuities are not accepted. Thank you.

[Emphasis mine] And, is Sushi Yasuda suffering from bad food and poor service? 987 reviews on Yelp suggest otherwise.

I personally plan to swing by the next time I’m in New York, but I’m hoping more restaurants embrace Sushi Yasuda’s example of paying their workers better and abolishing what, to me, seems like an archaic and irrational practice.

Published in Blog

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