Skip to content →

Brainteasers are a Complete Waste of Time

In hiring that is.

At least that’s what Google’s Head of People Operations (the Google-y term for HR) Laszlo Bock said in a recent interview with the New York Times. While most of the article is about the fascinating data-driven approach Bock’s group has taken to try to improve how they hire and retain the best employees, his point on the lack of success with using Fermi problems (brainteasers that physicist Enrico Fermi was apparently known for enjoying) that Microsoft and Google were famous for asking in job interviews caught my eye:

On the hiring side, we found that brainteasers are a complete waste of time. How many golf balls can you fit into an airplane? How many gas stations in Manhattan? A complete waste of time. They don’t predict anything. They serve primarily to make the interviewer feel smart.

[emphasis mine]

I personally loathe brainteasers and have walked away from companies who have dared to use those questions on me (I’ve been asked the golf ball question by two interviewers at one company). While they supposedly push the interviewee to demonstrate intellectual horsepower, the complete irrelevance to the important functions of the job, the lack of information this type of question shines on the character or ethic or work experiences of the job candidate, and the fact that many of these are easily looked up online make answers to these questions pretty useless in determining job fit.

So, if you’re an interviewer – do your interviewees and your company a favor: skip the Fermi problems and focus, instead, on ways to probe relevant knowledge and a candidate’s cultural fit in a rigorous, repeatable process.

Published in Blog

  • Brij Bhushan

    Ben, depends on how you use puzzles or brain teasers. If used to check thinking process and not the eventual answer , combined with good amount of cross questioning, it can throw good light at how someone thinks and can help.

    We used some very basic puzzles while hiring junior ops talent at our startup to test persistence, deduction and breadth of thinking. It worked well.

    Obscure brain teasers must be banned though 🙂

  • Ben

    I think a few too many folks use overly obscure ones/without the careful deliberation you guys used 🙂

%d bloggers like this: