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The Prodigal Tablet Convert

lg-android-tabletWhen the Wifi-only version of the first Android Honeycomb tablet, the Motorola Xoom, became available for sale, I bought the device, partly because of my “Fandroid” love for Android devices but mostly because, as a Tech enthusiast, I felt like I needed to own a tablet just to understand what everyone was talking about.

While I liked the device (especially after the Honeycomb 3.1 update), I felt a little weird because I didn’t really have a good idea of why I would ever need it. Tablets, while functional and cool, were not as large in screen size or as powerful as a laptop (some of which are also pretty portable: take my girlfriend’s recently purchased Lenovo X220 or the new MacBook Airs for instance), they weren’t as cheap/didn’t have as long of a battery life/didn’t have the amazing displays of dedicated eReaders like Amazon’s Kindle, and they weren’t as portable as a smartphone. I was frankly baffled: just when would you use an iPad/an Android tablet instead of a laptop, eReader, or a smartphone?

It didn’t help that many of my friends seemed to give waffling answers (and no, it didn’t really vary whether or not they had an iPad or an Android tablet – sorry Apple fanboi’s, you’re not that special :-)) or that one of the partners at my fund had misplaced his iPad and didn’t realize it for a month! To hopefully discover the “killer application” for these mysterious devices, I pushed myself to use the tablet more to see if I could find a “natural fit” and, except for gaming and for reading/browsing casually in bed, the whole experience felt very “well, I needed a bigger screen than my phone and was too lazy to turn on my laptop.” So for quite some time, I simply chalked up the latest demand as people wanting the latest gadget rather than anything particularly useful.

ASUS_EeePad_Transformer_-550x412This changed recently when, on a whim, I decided to buy carrying case and Bluetooth keyboard for my Xoom. And, upon receiving it, I was kind of blown away. Although it looked (and still does) a little funny to me — why use a Tablet plus Bluetooth Keyboard when you could just use a laptop –  that was enough to change my perspective on the utility of the device. It was no longer just a “bigger smartphone” – it became the full potential of what the netbook category itself had aimed to be: an easy-to-use, cheap consumer-grade laptop replacement that was not sucked into the “Wintel” dominion of Intel and Microsoft. It was that realization/newfound purpose for the device (as well as a nifty $100 off coupon) which also sucked my girlfriend, a long skeptic of why I had bought a tablet, in to buying an ASUS Eee Pad Transformer and dock (see image to the left).

I know its not the most profound of epiphanies – after all, even in my first comment on the iPad speculations I had suggested the potential risk to Apple of letting the iPad be so good that it starts replacing lower-end Macbook Air/Macbook devices – but suddenly the ability to write longer emails/compose documents made my tablet the go-to device for everything but the most processor-intensive or intricate of tasks, and that, combined with the abundance of tablets I’ve seen in Silicon Valley business settings, has convinced me that the “killer app” for the iPad and the Xoom and the whole host of coming Android tablets will be as computer replacements.

So, (hardware and software) developers out there and folks who want to pursue something potentially very disruptive or who want the venture capital side of me to pay attention to you: find me killer new apps/services designed to help tablets more replace computers (especially in the enterprise – I have become somewhat enchanted by that opportunity) and you’ll get it.

(Image credit – Tablet) (Image credit – ASUS Eee Pad Transformer)

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  • Chris

    I found that I preferred using my iPad (to a laptop) anytime I’m anywhere but a desk; in bed, on a couch, etc.

  • Charlie Carriere

    I wish I had an app that made my iPad levitate in front of my face.

    – Sent from my iPad

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