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Streaming Music Lockers

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I was lucky enough to receive early access to Google’s Music Beta service, the new streaming music service Google announced at their recent Google I/O event. It’s a service that’s fairly similar to Amazon’s Cloud Drive and the streaming service which Apple is rumored to be announcing soon. I’ve used the service for about two weeks, and I have to confess I’m confused as to why everyone is so excited about this.

Let me be clear: I think the service works perfectly fine. I, of course, have some complaints. The web interface, at least not to my knowledge, doesn’t provide a simple way to play or queue individual songs without queuing up the next song in the list. There can also be an awkward buffering pause at the start of playback (although I’ve noticed the software intelligently pre-caches the next song in the list) which can also be a little annoying. And, on my super-slow connection, it took two days to upload my music collection (whereas its been rumored that Apple will simply identify the song and pull it from its own collection). But, overall, I’ve been impressed with the quality. The quality of the playback across all of my devices (including my smartphone even when its not on WiFi) is good, and the ability to easily sync playlists across all of my devices is a nice touch. The free music. The instant playlists and integration with my Android devices are also thoughtful touches.

But my confusion has nothing to do with whether or not the service works: its whether or not this service is actually all that valuable to a large swath of users. While I have a relatively large music collection, I (and I’m willing to bet most people) don’t add to that collection all that often. When you couple that with the fact that storage is pretty cheap (as anyone who bought a USB stick and looked at the prices again 6 months later has noticed), it makes it easy to manage your music collection between your computer and your phone with iTunes or Windows Media Player without Apple or Google or Amazon going through the hassle of setting up an elaborate cloud setup.

For someone like me with four separate devices (a personal laptop, a work laptop, a DROID2 smartphone, and a tablet), this becomes a little more interesting as synching between all four can be a pain, but I don’t know how many people fall into that category. And, even if they did, music services like Mog, Spotify, and Grooveshark offer essentially the same thing – streaming music – except without the limitations of what’s in your own music collection.

Obviously, there are things Amazon, Google, and Apple are doing which are better than good-old-fashioned-manual-synching and what the Mogs/Spotifys/Groovesharks of the world have built. And, if its not clear yet, I do think these services are cool and valuable. But my view here is that they’re not so much better to justify all the hype.

Of course, I have yet to see Steve Jobs’ announcement… maybe his reality distortion field will set me straight :-).

Published in Blog

  • I think the real value comes when you do add new music to your collection. The majority of people who listen to music on their mobile devices are required to re-sync their device every time they want to update their playlist. From the people that I’ve talked to, that is the main annoyance of using an iPod.

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