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Addendum to iPhone/DROID2

Having written a long treatise on how the DROID 2 and iPhone 4 stack up against one another, I thought it would be good to add another post on where I thought both phones were deficient in the hopes that folks from the smartphone industry would listen intently so that my next phone choice is more clear. Note: I’ve focused this list on things that I think are actually do-able, rather than far-off wishes which are probably beyond our current technology (e.g., week-long battery life, Star Trek-like voice commands, etc):

  • Usage profiles: One of the biggest pains with using smartphones is that they are a pain to customize. The limited screen real-estate and the difficulty of relying on keyboard shortcuts means that settings are buried under multiple menus. This is fine if you really only use your phone in one way, or if you only need to change one or two sets of settings. It is not useful if, like me, you want your phone to act a specific way at work but a fairly different way in the car, or in the home. In that case, both Android and iPhone are severely lacking. The Android Tasker app allows me to create numerous profiles (I’ve created a in-car, in-meeting, at home/office profile and separate profiles for weekends and weeknights with regards to notifications and email sync) – and so is well worth the $6 price – but it is not as elegant of a solution as if it were integrated into the OS, exposing additional functionality.
  • Seamless computer-to-phone: Because smartphones have small screens, weak processors, and semi-awkward input interfaces, there are some things (i.e., research, making presentations/documents, crunching, etc) which I prefer to do on a larger computer.  This doesn’t mean, however, that I want my smartphone to be a completely separate entity from my computer. Quite the opposite – what I really want to see happen is a more seamless integration of computer and phone. At the most basic level, it means I want my bookmarks/browser history/favorite music easily synced between phone and computer. On a more sophisticated level, it means I want to be able to read/edit the same material (from the same place I left off) regardless of where I am or what device I’m using. If I’m running an application on my PC, I want to be able to pick up where I left on in a reduced-screen version of that application on my phone. Google’s Chrome-to-Phone, Mozilla’s Firefox Sync, and applications like DropBox just barely scratch the surface of this – and if someone figured out a highly effective way to do this (it would probably be Apple, Google, or Microsoft), they’d instantly have my business.
  • Email functions: Honestly, guys. Why is it that I cannot: (a) sort my email oldest to newest or (b) create new folders/labels from within your mail application? Blackberry could at least do (a).
  • Every app/screen should support landscape mode: This is one of my biggest pet peeves (more so with the iPhone than the DROID). Why is it that the homescreen of these devices doesn’t support landscape view (the DROID2 does but only if I pull the keyboard out)? Why is it that the iPhone App Store, Yelp, and Maps apps don’t support landscape mode? And why is it that I can’t lock the iPhone in landscape mode, but only in portrait mode? Apple, how about, instead of reviewing iPhone apps for what you deem to be “inappropriate content”, you force developers to support both portrait and landscape mode?

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