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Suggestion to Major Blogs and Websites

If I can make a suggestion to American TV studios to move towards a miniseries system, why not more?

image I recently spent a couple of hours organizing and pruning the many feeds that I follow in Google Reader. It’s become something of a necessity as my interests and information needs (and the amount of time I have to pursue them) change. But, this time as I found myself trying to figure out which news sites to follow, I found it easier to drop websites which didn’t have sub-feeds.

Most major blogs and websites today use RSS (Really Simple Syndication) feeds to let subscribers know when the site’s been updated without having to check the site constantly. While this is extremely convenient, the enormous number of updates that major websites like the New York Times issue per day make subscribing to their RSS feed an exercise in drinking from the firehose.

So, what to do? Thankfully, some major websites (the New York Times included) figured this out and now provide sub-feeds which provide only a fraction of the total content so that a subscriber can not only avoid RSS information overload but get a focused feed on the information that matters to him/her. The New York Times, for instance, allows you to only get RSS updates from their tech column, the Bits Blog, or even just the Venture Capital section of the New York Times’ Dealbook coverage.

Sadly, not every website is as forward-looking as the New York Times. Many sites don’t offer any sort of sub-feed at all (much to my dismay). Many sites who do offer it, offer a very paltry selection with very limited options.

And, given the choice between an information deluge which I mostly don’t want vs an alternative information source which gives me only the information I do want, I think the answer is obvious. As a result, with the exception of two feeds, I dropped from Google Reader every blog which posted more than once a day which didn’t give me a targeted sub-feed option.

In a world where its getting harder and harder for publications to hold on to readers, you’d think these sites would learn to offer more flexibility (especially when such flexibility is practically free to support if you have even a half-decent web content management system) in how their content is pushed.

But, I guess those sites weren’t interested in keeping me as a reader…

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Published in Blog

7 Comments

  1. without the “major” in the title, I would've interpreted your gchat status as, “SUGGESTION TO PPL WHO KEEP CHANGING FEEDS AND MAKING ME SUBSCRIBE” — stop.

  2. Ben Ben

    you should stop changing your feeds if you want me to stay subscribed 😛

  3. Ben Ben

    you should stop changing your feeds if you want me to stay subscribed 😛

  4. Ben Ben

    you should stop changing your feeds if you want me to stay subscribed 😛

  5. Lonsdale Lonsdale

    What about blogs like MR?

  6. Ben Ben

    It's 1 of 3 exceptions I made to the rule — and believe me, I've revisited
    whether or not to unsubscribe from MR many times

  7. […] of my favorite RSS feeds is Business Insider’s Chart of the Day. This chart came up a few weeks ago and made me think. […]

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