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No Money for Blockbuster

imageAs frequent readers of this blog know, my Benchpress-partner-in-crime Anthony and I like making ridiculous $100 offers for failing companies/divisions. One may inquire, then, given Blockbuster’s pitiful plight (which has been so poor that they’ve even been the subject of an Onion video parody), why we haven’t made our usual $100 offer.

The reason is simple, despite a couple of long discussions about Blockbuster: Anthony and I are simply not confident that we could turn around Blockbuster.

There really are only three ways for their management to proceed:

  1. Out-Netflix Netflix. The major benefit of this strategy is that this is the  business model that its management would be most familiar with – selling/renting video content. However, that’s about the only benefit that this strategy has. They are now strategic followers in a game which Netflix created and perfected, rather than leaders. But unlike Microsoft, they lack the resources to outlast or outinvest their compimageetition (in 2008, Blockbuster lost $374 million compared to having only $626 million of equity [all their assets minus all their debts], while Netflix made a profit of $122 million on $347 million of equity) nor do they have a premium offering to combine with their new strategy (e.g. Microsoft can roll innovations in things like Virtualization or Cloud Computing back into Windows or Office). Blockbuster’s one asset over Netflix, their physical presence around the country, is now relatively unimportant given the dominance of broadband internet (and new internet-enabled set top boxes) and the cheapness and speed of mail delivery and their traction thus far in gaining major electronics and set-top box wins has been disappointing. Their most promising press release (a partnership with Microsoft to use Live Mesh) may be the only thing going for them – and this happens to be with the player who’s not the leader in portable media players and who’s Live Mesh product won’t really get full force until late-2009/early-2010. This strategy is not promising.
  2. Fundamentally change their business model. This is an idea I pushed at first – suggesting that Blockbuster switch business models to selling home entertainment gear, something which could help tie with their current product offering and give them much needed partners to counter their current slump and lack of customer mindshare. However, Blockbuster’s lack of resources (as of Oct 2008, only $95 million in liquid cash) and profitability and the high risk and long-term horizon of this strategy make this un-feasible as a game changing play. Simply put, there’s not enough farm to bet on this strategy.
  3. Sell themselves. This is probably the most promising strategy in that Blockbuster will only need to turn itself around just enough to convince another buyer to acquire the assets. But, given that Blockbuster is the largest brick & mortar renter of videos and its dim prospects, its unlikely there are any buyers interested in owning a video rental store. Success would require finding a party interested in:
    • Buying a loser who’s likely to shed off much more in profits and brand power before being able to turn itself around
    • An unwieldy network of physical stores
    • Investing large amounts in either outcompeting Netflix, fundamentally changing their business, or some combination of the two

In other words – probably nobody (except people who still think real estate values will always go up).

Sorry, Blockbuster – maybe Dogbert will cough up some dough for you?
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(Image Credit) (Image Credit) (Dilbert)

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